get


get
get 1 Get, obtain, procure, secure, acquire, gain, win are comparable and often interchangeable when they mean to come into possession of.
Get is very general in its meaning and simple and familiar in its use. Thus, one may get something by fetching
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get a book from the table},}}

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by extracting
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get gold from ore},}}

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by receiving
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get a present},}}

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or as a return
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get interest on a loan

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Obtain is likewise rather general. It may suggest that the thing sought has been long desired or that it has come ink, possession only after the expenditure of considerable effort or the lapse of considerable time
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the satisfaction obtained by the sentiment of communion with others, of the breaking down of barriers— Dewey

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in western New York, where her early education was obtainedKnott

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Procure is likely to suggest planning and contriving over a period of time and the use of unspecified or sometimes questionable means
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the Duma laid claim to full power... and on March 15 procured the abdication of the frightened and despondent Nicholas II— Ogg & Zink

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some gifted spirit on our side procured (probably by larceny) a length of mine fuse— H. G. Wells

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Secure may suggest safe lasting possession or control
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the large income and fortune which a prospering business secures for him is of his own making— Hobson

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or it may suggest the gaining of what is hard to come by (as by reason of rarity or competition for possession); thus, one secures, rather than gets or acquires, a rare stamp by offering a higher price than other interested persons will pay
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almost absolute safety against infection could be secured by the simple precaution of using safe, potable water— Heiser

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Acquire may suggest devious acquisition
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the destruction of that ship by a Confederate cruiser, although it had acquired a British registry in order to avoid capture— Knott

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It may also indicate continued, sustained, or cumulative acquisition
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the habit of any virtue, moral or intellectual, cannot be assumed at once, but must be acquired by practice— Grandgent

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Gain often implies competition in acquiring something of value
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if a London merchant, however, can buy at Canton for half an ounce of silver, a commodity which he can afterwards sell at London for an ounce, he gains a hundred percent— Smith

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few men are placed in such fortunate circumstances as to be able to gain office— Oliver

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Win, though often interchangeable with gain, may suggest, as gain does not, favorable qualities leading naturally to the acquisition of something desired despite competition or obstacles
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the errors of his time were connected with his labors to remedy them, and win a firmer knowledge than dialectic could supply— H. O. Taylor

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Mrs. Woolf's fiction is too negligent of the requirements of the common reader to win a wide following— Millett

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Analogous words: fetch, *bring: extract, elicit, extort, *educe, evoke: *receive, accept: seize, *take, grasp, grab, clutch: effect, accomplish, achieve (see PERFORM): *incur, contract, catch
Contrasted words: *forgo, eschew, abnegate, sacrifice, forbear
2 beget, procreate, sire, *generate, engender, breed, propagate, reproduce
Analogous words: see those at BEGET
3 *induce, persuade, prevail
Analogous words: *move, actuate, drive, impel: *incite, instigate, abet

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Get — (g[e^]t), v. i. 1. To make acquisition; to gain; to profit; to receive accessions; to be increased. [1913 Webster] We mourn, France smiles; we lose, they daily get. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To arrive at, or bring one s self into, a state,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Get — (g[e^]t), v. t. [imp. {Got} (g[o^]t) (Obs. {Gat} (g[a^]t)); p. p. {Got} (Obsolescent {Gotten} (g[o^]t t n)); p. pr. & vb. n. {Getting}.] [OE. geten, AS. gitan, gietan (in comp.); akin to Icel. geta, Goth. bigitan to find, L. prehendere to seize,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Get Up — can refer to:*GetUp!, the Australian political campaigning organisation *Get up!, a film directed by Kazuyuki Izutsu *GET UP, the graduate employee unionizing campaign at the University of Pennsylvania. Music *Get Up (Ciara song), a song by Ciara …   Wikipedia

  • get up — {v.} 1. To get out of bed. * /John s mother told him that it was time to get up./ 2. To stand up; get to your feet. * /A man should get up when a woman comes into the room./ 3. To prepare; get ready. * /Mary got up a picnic for her visitor./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get up — {v.} 1. To get out of bed. * /John s mother told him that it was time to get up./ 2. To stand up; get to your feet. * /A man should get up when a woman comes into the room./ 3. To prepare; get ready. * /Mary got up a picnic for her visitor./ *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • Get It On — is the title of more than one song:* Get It On (T. Rex song), the 1971 song from the album Electric Warrior also known as Bang A Gong (Get It On) , later covered by Power Station in 1985. * Get It On (Chase song), also from 1971. It was this song …   Wikipedia

  • Get — may refer to: *GET, the most common type of HTTP request *Get (animal), the offspring of a given individual animal *Get, a Norwegian cable distributor, formerly known as UPC Norway. *Get (divorce document) the Jewish divorce procedure. *Get… …   Wikipedia

  • get it — {v.} 1. See: CATCH IT. 2. To understand; comprehend; grasp. * / I can t get it, John said. Why do you spend so much on clothes. / …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get on — or[get onto] {v.}, {informal} 1. To speak to (someone) roughly about something he did wrong; blame; scold. * /Mrs. Thompson got on the girls for not keeping their rooms clean./ * /The fans got on the new shortstop after he made several errors./… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get it — {v.} 1. See: CATCH IT. 2. To understand; comprehend; grasp. * / I can t get it, John said. Why do you spend so much on clothes. / …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • get on — or[get onto] {v.}, {informal} 1. To speak to (someone) roughly about something he did wrong; blame; scold. * /Mrs. Thompson got on the girls for not keeping their rooms clean./ * /The fans got on the new shortstop after he made several errors./… …   Dictionary of American idioms


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